16-17 October 2008 (Preconference Workshops: 15 October) • Novotel London West, London, UK
Internet Librarian International 2008
Translating 2.0 Technologies for Tangible Benefits & Transparency
2008 Links

 
Internet Librarian International 2008
Day One - Thursday 16 October

WELCOME AND OPENING KEYNOTE: People at the Heart of Innovation
09.00 – 10.15

Guy R. Cloutier, The Power of the Future (France, Canada)

Guy R. CloutierWe are living in a fast-paced world driven by constant change and filled with new and unexpected challenges.   Are we ready to face them? What does the future hold for people and organisations? Are we prepared for tomorrow’s reality? How can we use creativity and our networks to achieve our goals? This lecture, by the author of The Power of the Future, founder of an international trading house exporting inventions around the world, and an inspiring teacher and trainer, will stress: Awakening — discovering fears that impede professionals in realising their objectives; Awareness — promoting creativity and innovation to improve individual and collective performance; and Realisation — learning how to promote innovation by creating a new type of network, the family of enterprises. 

TrackLinkTrack A - Search and Discovery
SessionLinkSession A101 - Beyond Search: Why Traditional Search Is Broken and How It Affects Information Professionals
10.45 – 11.30

Stephen E. Arnold, ArnoldIT.com

A longtime observer of the search and discovery industry, Steve Arnold will share his ideas about why traditional search is broken. What developments at Google will affect information professionals? Plus he’ll look at Google’s report capability that goes beyond a laundry list of results. How do search engine companies’ concentration on enterprise search relate to web search? Are there new search engines that we should be learning about? Come hear what this visionary thinker and author has to tell us about the future of search. 

SessionLinkCoffee Break
11.30 – 11.45

SessionLinkSession A102 - Search Tips
11.45 – 12.30

Karen Blakeman, RBA Information Services

Want to turbo-charge your actual web research? Karen Blakeman, well-known search expert, trainer, speaker and editor of Tales from The Terminal Room, provides her latest discoveries about web search, including tips on how to most effectively use new technologies to bolster your research skills.

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SessionLinkLunch Break and Visit the Sponsor Showcase
12.30 – 14.00

SessionLinkSession A103 - Hot Topics in Search and Discovery
14.00 – 14.45

Helle Lauridsen, Discovery Services, Serials Solutions

Search developments move at the speed of light. This session will identify the hot topics, the most recent advances and improvements and the areas that remain insufficient for the research requirements of information professionals. 

SessionLinkSession A104 - Specialised Search Projects
15.00 – 15.45

Sophia Jones, SHERPA University of Nottingham
Linda Kerr, Intute , Heriot Watt University
Harry Oosterveen, IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre
Ms. Tettje van Daalen, IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre

Building and managing institutional repositories is a growing job requirement for academic and research librarians. The Intute Repository Search is a JISC-funded search service/project that aggregates metadata from repositories to increase visibility of information and make it readily accessible. The IRC is researching why information and knowledge suitable at one level of government in Uganda is not available or used at other levels and will help make it more accessible at all levels.
 

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SessionLinkTea Break
15.45 – 16.15

SessionLinkSession A105 - News in Review
16.15 – 17.00

Ran Hock, Online Strategies

The web is a haven for news junkies and for those engaged in searching the news for important information in support of research projects. As more and more news sources enter the arena, they are supplemented by information from “citizen journalists”. Specialized news search engines such as NewsNow, international newsfeeds from general web search engines such as Google and Yahoo!, and the blogosphere combine to present multiple challenges to researchers: overlapping information, news versus commentary and completeness of coverage. 

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SessionLinkNetworking Reception
17.00 – 18.00

TrackLinkTrack B - Special Collections
SessionLinkSession B101 - New Initiatives for Old Resources
10.45 – 11.30

Mr Barry J Smith, The British Library
Mr. Edward Tasikani, Faulty of Social Science, University of Zimbabwe Main Library
Richard Lalleman, Focuss.Info
Michel G Wesseling, Institute of Social Studies EADI-IMWG; WSWB; HIN

Three projects that bring new life to antiquarian and/or obscure materials show the power of technology. The British Library’s Turning the Pages project examines how it has brought to life some of its unique books and manuscripts. In Zimbabwe, the creation of a National Newspaper Repository provides vital primary information to researchers. The global studies project of Focuss.Info brings together community contributed content. 

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SessionLinkCoffee Break
11.30 – 11.45

SessionLinkSession B102 - The OPAC and Library of the Future
11.45 – 12.30

Dr Joy Palmer, Mimas, University of Manchester
Mr Rurik Thomas Greenall, NTNU Library

Joy Palmer describes Copac, the UK union library catalogue funded through JISC, and the role of service in a 2.0 environment. Identifying  what users need remains elusive, but personalisation, recommender systems and knowledge communities play important roles. Project UBiT at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) explores the development of web-based services and the creation of a forum for staff to develop and improve services. The concrete products that can be deployed in libraries will contribute to the library of the future. 

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SessionLinkLunch Break and Visit the Sponsor Showcase
12.30 – 14.00

SessionLinkSession B103 - Preservation for the Next Generation
14.00 – 14.45

Marieke Guy, Community & Outreach Team, UKOLN , University of Bath

In the context of web 2.0—and even of web 1.0—the traditional policies and procedures surrounding preservation seen marginalised. The focus now is on continuous improvement to functionality. There is a danger that a lack of understanding of the importance of preservation issues and a failure to develop policies covering the preservation of appropriate resources can lead to a loss of organisational memory. Do we really want to be regarded by future generations as the “digital dark ages”? What approaches can we take to the preservation process and what strategies should we implement? 

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SessionLinkSession B104 - What Constitutes a Next Generation Library, Part I
15.00 – 15.45

Dr. Michael Stephens, San Jose State University & Tame the Web
Michael Casey, Gwinnett Public Library
Gwenda Sippings
Mr Thomas Brevik, Bookboat/Main library, Lindaas Public Library

This panel discussion will address the issue of what constitutes a next-generation library. What are its attributes? Will you recognise it when you see it? Designed to be interactive, the panellists are eager to hear the views of the internet librarians in the audience. 

SessionLinkTea Break
15.45 – 16.15

SessionLinkSession B105 - What Constitutes a Next Generation Library, Part II
16.15 – 17.00

Dr. Michael Stephens, San Jose State University & Tame the Web
Michael Casey, Gwinnett Public Library
Gwenda Sippings
Mr Thomas Brevik, Bookboat/Main library, Lindaas Public Library

Continuing the discussion of next generation libraries after the tea break, the panel will look at examples of innovative next generation libraries. 

SessionLinkNetworking Reception
17.00 – 18.00

TrackLinkTrack C - Transparent Management
SessionLinkSession C101 - The Transparent Library
10.45 – 11.30

Dr. Michael Stephens, San Jose State University & Tame the Web
Michael Casey, Gwinnett Public Library

Looking at some innovative and not so innovative libraries, Michael Stephens and Michael Casey, authors of “The Transparent Library”,  examine both failed and successful attempts to create an open and flexible library culture in a fast-moving technological world. It’s all here in this in-depth, focussed session that provides some practical tips on a key facet of library 2.0—evaluating library services in a 2.0 world in order to understand the tangible benefits to users. 

SessionLinkCoffee Break
11.30 – 11.45

SessionLinkSession C102 - Using Google Analytics at Library Websites
11.45 – 12.30

Marshall Breeding, Vanderbilt University Library Technology Guides
Dr Tony Hirst, Department of Communciation and Systems, The Open University
Hassan Sheikh, Library, The Open University

With the investments that libraries make in developing their websites, it’s critical to constantly measure use levels and discern patterns and  trends. Google Analytics offers a very sophisticated approach to web analytics, with a low barrier to entry and eye-catching graphical reports. Breeding demonstrates how he uses Google Analytics for various sites at Vanderbilt University, while Hirst and Sheikh describe their use of analytics at The Open University’s newly designed Open Library 2.0.
 

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SessionLinkLunch Break and Visit the Sponsor Showcase
12.30 – 14.00

SessionLinkSession C103 - Managing E-Resources
14.00 – 14.45

Sharon Mehl, Applied Materials
Zibute Petrauskiene, Vilnius University

describes the transformation of two separate libraries into one global Managing electronic resources can have very different meanings for different types of institutions. For a corporate library, Sharon Mehlelibrary, a process that involved licensing issues, selection of additional databases, technical difficulties, redesigning the portal and global pricing. For an academic library, Zibute Petrauskiene used survey methods to determine how to transform the concept of the library and re-engineer its activities.

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SessionLinkSession C104 - Return on Library Technology Investment
15.00 – 15.45

Ken Chad, Ken Chad Consulting

The growth and maturation of the web and its associated technologies have driven changes in business models and user behaviours. Whilst it is clear that the library “function” has continuing and growing value, it is not clear what role “conventional” libraries will play in an information economy. This is a period of disruptive change. To survive and thrive, librarians must understand their ROI on open source, vertical search, uniform resource management and library systems. This presentation will guide you through the complex landscape. 

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SessionLinkTea Break
15.45 – 16.15

SessionLinkSession C105 - Creating and Funding New Initiatives
16.15 – 17.00

Terence Huwe, Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, University of California - Berkeley
Dr Martie van Deventer, CSIR
Heila Pienaar, Department of Library Services, University of Pretoria

In his Tale of (2.0) Repositories, Terence Huwe notes that web 2.0 applications and library 2.0 services are converging, giving archivists  and digital repository managers opportunities in two-way discourse as we manage content and create new projects. Scholarly communities of practice are more open to using interactive web tools.  In South Africa, the concept of technology demonstrators, more frequently associated with warfare, have helped librarians battle for appropriate funding for a virtual research environment project. 

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SessionLinkNetworking Reception
17.00 – 18.00

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