Get Real. Stay Relevant.
Internet Librarian International 2010: 14-15 October 2010, Workshops 13 October, Novotel London West, London, UK
The Innovation and Technology Conference for Information Professionals focused on
Knowledge and Information Management • Library Systems • E-Resources • Digital Libraries • Search
2010 Links

 
Thursday, 14 October 2010
TrackLinkWelcome and Opening Keynote
SessionLink
What Would Socrates Say?
09.00 – 10.15

Best-selling author, scholar and consultant, Robert Rowland Smith, brings his unique perspective on daily life to the world of information. In his book Breakfast with Socrates, he applied the thoughts and teachings of philosophers to the mundane tasks of everyday life. He characterised Socrates as intensely curious, with a probing and inventive mind. How can philosophy help internet librarians reflect on what we do, on our role within our organisations? In the knowledge economy, where work becomes intangible and spending on services declines, how do we demonstrate the basic worth of what we produce?

TrackLinkTrack A - Looking Ahead to Value
SessionLink
Coffee break and Sponsor Showcase opens
10.15 – 10.45
SessionLink
Session A101 - Future Success Must be Earned
10.45 – 11.30
Barbro Wigell-Ryynänen, Ministry of Education and Culture
Oliver Howe, Cengage Learning EMEA Ltd

Libraries are now competing with other players such as Google and must focus on expertise and emphasise  quality in order to meet future challenges. Finnish libraries are heavily used, both as physical and virtual spaces. Behind the success story is a framework for continuous development of services. The secrets to their success can be applied to other types of libraries and other countries.

SessionLink
Session A102 - Future of Academic Libraries
11.45 – 12.30
Mal Booth, University Library, University of Technology Sydney
Michael Jubb, Research Information Network

At University of Technology Sydney (UTS), plans for a new library building are fuelling a re-imagining of the library and its services. The aim is to have a sustainable, client-focused and innovative library, situated equally in the physical and digital environments. The challenge of demonstrating value is addressed in research from RIN, which centres on how libraries can sustain their position in supporting the missions of their host universities. What are the relationships between levels of expenditure, usage and research success of library collections? Looking out 20 years, RIN speculates on future scenarios and examines value propositions.

SessionLink
Lunch break and visit the Sponsor Showcase
12.30 – 14.00
SessionLink
Session A103 - Library Teams and Peer Collaboration
14.00 – 14.45
Andrew Clark, UCB Celltech Member of Pharma Documentation Ring and Special Libraries Association
Helen Fallon, National University of Ireland Maynooth
Sharon L Bostick Ph.D, Illinois Institute of Technology

At pharmaceutical company UCB, strategic library planning and the need to maximise the value of library content and services enabled the small specialist global library team to make changes across the organisation. Its success with technology innovation significantly influenced corporate initiatives and ensured that the library remains a high performing team. Global cooperation is also the theme of an academic writing programme for librarians developed in Ireland. A collaborative peer-support blog is used across continents to use technology to further develop academic writing.

SessionLink
Session A104 - Evolution of Working Environments
15.00 – 15.45
Helen Leech, Surrey County Library Service
Xoliswa Matroko, CSIR Information Services (CSIRIS), Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)

The environments in which internet librarians work is changing, due both to technological advances and evolving attitudes of organisations towards the role of information professionals. In Surrey, the rise of web 2.0 and collaborative tools has led to the development of a multi-authority version of 23 Things, a staff wiki, online reading groups, public bookmarks, implementations of Google Wave and other services. At CSIR, an embedded library strategy moves information professionals closer to their clients, the research staff.

SessionLink
Tea break in the Sponsor Showcase
15.45 – 16.15
SessionLink
Session A105 - Visionary Views
16.15 – 17.00
Tony Hirst, Department of Communication and Systems, The Open University
Bethan Ruddock, MIMAS, University of Manchester

Tony Hirst reports on his 10 week Arcadia Fellowship with the Cambridge University Library, where he looked at "quick wins" available to a traditional university library, particularly through a rapid prototyping approach. New professional Bethan Ruddock asks the hard questions about future libraries of all types. What can information professionals expect in academic, public, corporate and other types of libraries going forward? Given changes in technology, it's more important than ever for librarians to talk with those outside the profession to garner support.

TrackLinkTrack B - Information Discovery
SessionLink
Coffee break and Sponsor Showcase opens
10.15 – 10.45
SessionLink
Session B101 - Searching for Search Solutions
10.45 – 11.30
Patrick Kremer, Acquisitions, Portals and Information Services, INIST CNRS
John Taylor, ProQuest

The watchword today for search is simplicity. Users expect a single search box from which they can find everything. Scientific and technical information provider INIST/CNRS uses the Netvibes platform for its BiblioCNRS portal. Companies with search systems which pre-date the internet must earn new users by shedding old systems and old cultures, without undermining old loyalties. ProQuest’s migration to a single, unified search platform in 2010 had triple the issues, with three legacy platforms to contend with. Lessons from ProQuest’s and INIST/CNRS's approaches can be applied by libraries in their own platform development projects.

SessionLink
Session B102 - Next Generation Information Discovery
11.45 – 12.30
Anne-Lena Westrum, Oslo Public Library
Nancy Moussa, University of Michigan

User expectations – derived from web 2.0, the social web and crowdsourcing – drive next generation information discovery projects. The Pode project in Oslo tested several new open source products and investigated semantic web technology. The conversion of MARC records to RDF will add linked data to the catalogue and encourage re-use of records. The University of Michigan is using WordPress to create an interface with which cataloguers can upload MARC records to a website and integrate digital images of
historical manuscripts, so that scholars can then comment, correct and add information to the records.

SessionLink
Lunch break and visit the Sponsor Showcase
12.30 – 14.00
SessionLink
Session B103 - Discovery, Dissemination and Outreach
14.00 – 14.45
Esben Fjord, Gladsaxe Public Libraries
Rob Haran, Shire

Regardless of the quality and quantity of resources and collections, the issue of publicising their value – even their existence – is a problem that transcends library type. Gladsaxe Public Libraries are experimenting with how to expose electronic resources in physical libraries. They have developed interfaces for different kinds of digital surfaces, including interactive digital screens, a chair (Sonic) for music listening and an interactive floor (The Cube). Fjord will describe the technological, legal and user interface challenges they experienced. The marketing and outreach issues faced by global pharmaceutical company Shire are philosophically the same as Gladsaxe’s, but a different clientele and geographic diversity have necessitated an approach aligned with company structure and ethos. Haran describes the successful initiatives used to help
employees discover electronic resources.

SessionLink
Session B104 - New Paradigms
15.00 – 15.45
David F Kane MLIS, Waterford Institute of Technology
Nils Pharo, Oslo University College

Microsoft Live Labs Pivot heralds a new paradigm for search, combining two separate behaviours – browsing and searching – and thus transforming the very nature of web search. When Waterford put its entire collection on Pivot, it began exploring what this means for both library users and managers. The Library Laboratory (Biblioteklaboratoriet), now in its fourth year, works as a think tank on issues related to developing standardised and open source ways of distributing library metadata.
Stretch your mind by learning of these two novel approaches to future library services.

SessionLink
Tea break in the Sponsor Showcase
15.45 – 16.15
SessionLink
Session B105 - Impacts of Virtual Presence and E-Resources
16.15 – 17.00
Susan Senese, University of Toronto Mississauga Library
Har Kaur Battu, Government Medical College and Hospital

A redesign project moved the University of Toronto’s website from a static, text heavy site to an interactive, informative and dynamic site that meets student expectations. Using Drupal, the project team developed some specialised applications and signage, increasing visibility and pushing information to students. Among medical libraries in India, there has been a sea change in information seeking behaviours. Easy availability of eresources has amplified the research process and necessitated more emphasis on checking quality of information.

TrackLinkTrack C - Resource Management
SessionLink
Coffee break and Sponsor Showcase opens
10.15 – 10.45
SessionLink
Session C101 - Relating Value to Price and Budget
10.45 – 11.30
Ulla de Stricker, de Stricker Associates
Armand Brevig, AstraZeneca
Anja Chemnitz Thygesen, Quartz Strategy Consultants

Making content decisions within budget has always been important, but with today’s economic situation, it’s become critical. In their presentation, de Stricker, Brevig and Chemnitz examine the complexity of value assessment and the justification to management.

SessionLink
Session C102 - Monitoring and Maximising Organisational Impact
11.45 – 12.30
Brian Kelly, UK Web Focus
Joy Palmer, Mimas, University of Manchester

The social web permeates our information departments and our personal lives. But how to measure the effectiveness of our use of the social web? Kelly’s talk will review ways in which a variety of social services, including blogs and Twitter, can be monitored for their effectiveness in achieving their desired goals. The traditional ‘usage’ statistics for online library services can be misleading. Mimas performed quantitative and qualitative research, with minimal resources, to bring a new understanding of how the services impact research and the knowledge economy. These presentations will give you new perspectives on measurement, monitoring, and valuing social and traditional services and improve your strategies for engagement.

SessionLink
Lunch break and visit the Sponsor Showcase
12.30 – 14.00
SessionLink
Session C103 - Working with Wikis
14.00 – 14.45
Karolien Selhorst, Association of Flemish Provinces (VVP)
Brunella Longo, Library and Information Specialist

Few online resources provoke as much controversy in the library community as Wikipedia. A Dutch project, ‘Wiki loves Bieb’ will set up a structural collaboration between Wikimedia Nederland and Dutch public libraries to investigate media literacy, how libraries and other local heritage partners can improve Wikipedia’s quality and the promotion of libraries as reference points. Libraries worldwide can learn from this project, using it as a prototype. Wikipedia, however, is not the only wiki in the world. Brunella Longo will describe the CPD-Wiki she set up to support a career repositioning plan and to experiment with new, open ways to share information among peers and colleagues.

SessionLink
Session C104 - Digital Services, Meet Customer Satisfaction
15.00 – 15.45
David McMenemy, University of Strathclyde
Steven Buchanan, University of Strathclyde
Arno Janssen, FrieslandCampina

McMenemy and Buchanan present the results of a survey of digital services in Scottish public libraries. Although public libraries are trusted sources of information, their websites are too frequently nothing more than ‘digitised leaflets’ and user satisfaction is dropping. How can libraries begin to thrive in their presentation of digital services? User satisfaction is important in the corporate world as well. Janssen gives an overview of how the Knowledge Information Centre at FrieslandCampina followed some new paths without leaving its customers behind. Important lessons about user satisfaction in disparate settings can be gleaned from this session.

SessionLink
Tea break in the Sponsor Showcase
15.45 – 16.15
SessionLink
Session C105 - Mashing Libraries to Build Communities
16.15 – 17.00
Owen Stephens, Owen Stephens Consulting

Library mashups are becoming increasingly popular – and possible – for two reasons. The technology to create mashups, such as Yahoo! Pipes, makes the exercise more accessible to those without an IT background. Second, governments are opening up their information, making it available as linked data, a step that encourages data reuse and repurposing. Library mashups can surface information to and about your community, raising the library’s status, proving the value of innovation and building excitement about new technologies and the information profession.

TrackLinkEvening Reception
SessionLink
Drinks Reception
17.00 – 18.00

All conference delegates and speakers are invited to a Drinks Reception from 17.00 – 18.00 on Thursday 14 October in the Sponsor Showcase, hosted by Information Today Ltd.

Stay connected

#ili2010
Diamond Sponsors





Platinum Sponsors


Bowker (UK) Ltd






Gold Sponsors




Association Sponsor

Learning Partner

Supported by

Industry Partner Sponsor

Media Partners








 © 2012, Information Today, Inc./Information Today Ltd. Privacy/Cookies Policy