Internet Librarian International 2003 Home Conference Exhibition Register
Organisers Press Office Total Library Solutions Contact Us

Internet Librarian International 2003 Conference
25 – 27 March 2003 • NEC, Birmingham, UK
Co-located with TLS, Total Library Solutions Exhibition, 26 & 27 March 2003
General Conference — Wednesday, 26 March

PRECONFERENCE WORKSHOPS
MONDAY, 24 MARCH
GENERAL CONFERENCE
TUESDAY, 26 MARCH
GENERAL CONFERENCE
THURSDAY, 27 MARCH
CONFERENCE
PROGRAMME
WEDNESDAY, 26 MARCH
TRACK A: WEB SEARCHING
WEDNESDAY, 26 MARCH
TRACK B: WEB STANDARDS/TECH
THURSDAY, 26 MARCH
TRACK C: DIGITAL LIBRARIES

KEYNOTE Concourse Suite
Moderator:  Nancy Garman, Conference Co-Chair, Information Today, Inc., USA

The British Library’s Digital Future

9:00 – 10:00

Richard Boulderstone, Director of e-Strategy, British Library

The British Library is creating a digital future for its collections and services as it embarks on a major effort to extend access to its world-class resources. Using electronic media and services to provide public access, opening up collections, creating productive partnerships, and developing new enterprises are central to the Library’s development of a digital library programme. Digitisation of many of the Library’s collections and archiving of materials that are “born digital” are high priorities. As the director of e-Strategy, Dr. Richard Boulderstone is the driving force behind the Library’s initiatives to use Internet technologies to make its collection available to the widest possible audience, leading the way into the 21st century.
 

Coffee Break — Sponsored by The Electronic Library Journal
10:00 – 10:30

The Electronic Library—the international journal for the application of technology in information environments—is delighted to sponsor this coffee 
break and invites all Internet Librarian International delegates to join us for coffee and to meet the journal’s editor, David Raitt. Free copies of The Electronic Library will be available during the coffee break.


TRACK A: Practical Web Searching Concourse Suite No. 1
Many Internet searchers, even librarians and information professionals, are self-taught, relying on advice from colleagues, personal experience, and articles, books, and newsletters. In this track, hear firsthand from information professionals who share their practical tips and advice, stressing hands-on, useful information you can take home and put to work immediately.

Moderator:  Tim Owen, CILIP, UK

Session A201 — Grass-Roots Knowledge-Sharing: Market Intelligence
10:30 – 11:15

Derek Fetzer, Owens Corning, Brussels, Belgium
Helen Clegg, R.R. Donnelly Europe

IT solutions alone will never ensure the success of a market intelligence effort. Effective market intelligence management requires employee involvement from all levels and the creation of an underlying environment that supports knowledge-sharing behaviours. According to Derek Fetzer from Owens Corning, the process should engage the entire organisation—from scientists to sales people, marketing, and customer service. And for a complete market intelligence function, external information cannot be ignored. Helen Clegg describes the RR Donnelly approach to market intelligence from this perspective.
 

Session A202 — Search Engine Overlap
11:30 – 12:30

Ran Hock, Online Strategies, USA

Why do you need to use more than one search engine? Taking a case-study approach to search engine overlap at the level of individual searches, Ran Hock, author of The Extreme Searcher’s Guide to Search Engines, analyses how many and what kinds of unique pages are covered by multiple engines, the relative importance of the additional information, the issue of duplicates, and why metasearch sites are not the way to go.
 

Lunch Break
12:30 – 14:00
 

Session A203 — Value for Money: You Mean I Have to Pay?
14:00 – 14:45

Marydee Ojala, Editor, ONLINE Magazine, USA

Most information professionals have never subscribed to the myth of free information on the Internet. However, management often thinks that getting something for nothing is a superb idea—and sometimes it is. In this session, Marydee Ojala investigates some of the reasons to pay—or not to pay—for information and explores whether free sites sometimes offer better information than fee-based services. Search examples illustrate decision points for when to use a fee-based or free source.
 

Session A204 — Crossfile Searching Revisited
15:00 – 15:45

Ben Soares, EDINA Data Library, Edinburgh University, UK
Karen Blakeman, RBA Information Services, UK

Xgrain, developed at Edinburgh University, is a tool for “shallow” cross-searching a group of A&I databases. Designed as a simple portal to the journals literature, Xgrain will have its own interface and will also be available for integration into subject-based and institutional portals. In the workplace, crossfile searching continues to be a key function as evidenced by the experiences of long-time business researcher Karen Blakeman.
 

Coffee Break
15:45 – 16:15
 

Session A205 — Cool Tools for Web Searching
16:15 – 17:00

Gary Price, Library Research and Internet Consulting, USA

Pack your search toolbox with great free or cheap Web resources and tools. Learn the secrets of successful Web searching as taught by Gary Price, a well-known searcher, author, and Web resource specialist. Gary’s review of the newest and best resources, tools, and strategies, all from a practical, hands-on viewpoint, will give you dozens of new ideas to take home to your keyboard.
 

WEDNESDAY RECEPTION
All delegates are invited to a reception in the Total Library Solutions Exhibit Hall when the conference sessions close on Wednesday afternoon. Join your colleagues for refreshments, great networking opportunities, and a chance to see new library products and services.


TRACK B: Web Standards & Technology Concourse Suite No. 2
Major changes are underway just below the surface of the Web. New formats, such as xHTML and XML, are beginning to replace the old, familiar HTML. What do these changes mean? What are the differences in these mark-up options? Do you need to learn new authoring skills? Interoperability is desirable, and the low cost of Web services holds the potential for stretching libraries’ meager resources. Open source software and blogging software also offer the opportunity to expand your library’s reach without breaking your budget. Join the knowledgeable experts in this track to quickly get up to speed on these crucial developments.

Moderator:  Frank Cervone, Northwestern University, USA

Session B201 — HTML Is Dead!
10:30 – 11:15

Brian Kelly, UK Web Focus, UKOLN, UK

We are now all familiar with HTML. But awareness of new formats such as XML and related technologies is not so widespread. Brian Kelly describes the original Web architecture, which had limitations, but was successful due to its simplicity. He will explain why he claims that HTML is dead and tell how XML killed it. Also, hear about related formats and jargon such as CSS, SVG and SMIL—and XSLT, which is reviving HTML in a new format known as xHTML.
 

Session B202 — Web Services: Next-Generation Interoperability for Libraries
11:30 – 12:30

Joaquim Carvalho, University of Coimbra, &
Maria Inês Cordeiro, Art Library, Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Portugal

Web services are a new technology for sharing information and services among different information systems. The primary novelty and advantage of Web services are the speed and low cost of implementation—major factors for many libraries. Providing bibliographic systems with Web services capabilities can expand dramatically the dissemination and reusability of bibliographic data. In this session, explore Web services and their potential for disclosing “hidden Web” database resources while creating interoperability between library systems.
 

Lunch Break
12:30 – 14:00
 

Session B203 — Authoring Web Sites in xHTML
14:00 – 14:45

Darlene Fichter, Data Librarian, University of Saskatchewan, Canada

What is xHTML and why should you use it? What are the major differences between HTML and xHTML? Learn about software packages that let you author in xHTML. Find out about tools that help you convert existing sites and xHTML validators. Take home a list of useful resource sites that will help you get started using xHTML.
 

Session B204 — Open Source Software for Libraries
15:00 – 15:45

Frank Cervone, Assistant University Librarian for Information Technology, Northwestern University, USA

More and more libraries are turning to open source solutions to help deliver core library services. What is open source software and what is the philosophy behind it? Find out what all the excitement is about, how your library can find and use open source software, and how your staff might contribute to an open source project.
 

Coffee Break
15:45 – 16:15
 

Session B205 — Blogging
16:15 – 17:00

Darlene Fichter, Data Librarian, University of Saskatchewan, Canada

Blogging software is morphing from use for personal journals into content management systems and collaborative communities. When you decide to set up a blog, you have dozens of choices. Does your blog need to be remotely hosted or installed locally? What features and services matter? Get up to speed with blogging software basics. Discover exciting add-ons and innovative features. And learn how your library can find and use these highly personal, but often informative, resources as reference tools, as well.
 

WEDNESDAY RECEPTION
All delegates are invited to a reception in the Total Library Solutions Exhibit Hall when the conference sessions close on Wednesday afternoon. Join your colleagues for refreshments, great networking opportunities, and a chance to see new library products and services.


TRACK C: Digital Libraries & Electronic Resources Concourse Suite No. 19
Digital libraries, virtual reference services, and electronic resources have combined to create a truly global information environment. What are the new rules and tools for making the most of these resources? How do you put e-journals, e-books, and digital libraries of text, images, and audio to work in your library? The speakers in this track share their visions—and their hard-won experience in the new digital information world.

Moderator:  Alison McNab, University of Nottingham, UK

Session C201 — Digitisation Collaboration: Ways of Working Together
10:30 – 11:15

Cokie Anderson, Oklahoma State University, USA

Digitisation projects require four elements: materials, equipment (computers, scanners, software), personnel with expertise in digitisation, and funding. Most institutions must look outside their walls for one or more elements. But through collaboration, institutions can share the burden. One organisation may “hire” another to digitise its materials; several institutions may perform different parts of the process; or a number of institutions may band together to form a “digital coalition.” Explore the challenges and opportunities presented by collaboration, as well as how to find potential partners and ways to initiate collaborative projects.
 

Session C202 — Acquiring and Managing E-Journals
11:30 – 12:30

Tony Kidd, Head of Serials/Document Delivery, Glasgow University, UK
Peter Shepherd, Project Director, COUNTER Project, UK

If you buy the e-journal, can you cancel the print subscription? Do you have rights to the backfiles? For which publishers? Who can access the e-journals? How do you track usage and digital rights? These and a host of other questions besiege librarians who embark on e-journal collection management projects. Tony Kidd has hands-on experience managing e-journals and shares his advice and expertise on these and other burning questions. Peter Shepherd of the COUNTER (Counting Online Usage of NeTworked Electronic Resources) brings a different perspective, describing a collaborative effort by the publishers to measure usage of online information resources and to make Web logs and files accessible to subscriber organisations.
 

Lunch Break
12:30 – 14:00
 

Session C203 — Improving Access to Digital Resources
14:00 – 14:45

Ruth Jenkins, Assistant Director, Information Services Division of Learning & Research Support, University of Birmingham
Zsuzsanna Toszegi, Managing Director, & Andras Kora, Head of the Library Division, John von Neumann Digital Library & Multimedia Centre, Hungary

When the Nobel Prize in Literature was awarded to the Hungarian writer Imre Kertesz in October 2002, the John von Neumann Digital Library began to create e-book versions of his works the very next day. The Digital Literary Academy plays a major role in providing electronic access to the complete works of the major Hungarian authors. Hear about the Digital Library’s strategies, new document formats—and the effects and side effects of its instant popularity. At the University of Birmingham, the eJournals Directory offers access to electronic journals via TDNet, and the eResources Directory provides Web-based access to CD-ROMs, online databases, and major Web sites. Ruth Jenkins discusses how the services were chosen and implemented, as well as how the university is planning to integrate them with the library management system, student portal, and virtual learning environment.
 

Session C204 — E-Books: Do They Belong in Libraries?
15:00 – 15:45

Penny Garrod, Public Library Networking Focus, UKOLN, UK
Louise Edwards, Collection Manager, Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC), UK

A new sense of realism has pervaded the world of e-books, and librarians need a clear strategy to meet this. Are e-books still worth adding to library e-collections or has the collapse of the dot-com market and the economic downturn dealt them a fatal blow? Hear examples of libraries around the world where e-books have been acquired and incorporated into services. Ask questions such as which audiences or users gain the most benefit from e-books and why; are novels suitable for the e-book format; and what impact will emerging and converged technologies have on e-books? How are e-books developing within the academic sector and how is the future looking? What are the critical issues that librarians should be addressing? Join these two knowledgeable speakers to discuss examples and debate the pros and cons of this controversial topic.
 

Coffee Break
15:45 – 16:15
 

Session C205 — Rich Media on the Internet: Technology, Implementation, & Distribution
16:00 – 17:00

Brad Eden, Head, Bibliographic & Metadata Services, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, USA
Richard Paterson, Head of Knowledge, British Film Institute, UK
Susanne Buus-Pedersen, Music Librarian, Copenhagen Public Library, Denmark

Project Netmus (music), the British Film Institute (film and television), and a digital gallery at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) are real-life illustrations of how digital repositories can be incorporated into Web projects. The British Film Institute is very close to launching a project called “screenonline,” containing up to 1,000 hours of British film. Two large Danish libraries have cooperated to allow patrons to download music files from Netmus, and the libraries’ attention to rights management issues is of special interest. Streaming audio and video are part of the latest update to UNLV’s digital gallery project, along with a radical redesign. Hear lessons learned from three project leaders who are really putting rich media on the Internet today.
 

WEDNESDAY RECEPTION
All delegates are invited to a reception in the Total Library Solutions Exhibit Hall when the conference sessions close on Wednesday afternoon. Join your colleagues for refreshments, great networking opportunities, and a chance to see new library products and services.

 


Internet Librarian International 2003 Home Conference Exhibition Register
Organisers Press Office Total Library Solutions Contact Us